Acute Flaccid Monoplegia After an Asthmatic Attack

Authors

  • Aphirak Mekmangkonthong Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Thammasat University Hospital, Pathum Thani, Thailand
  • Khanittha Khusiwilai Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand
  • Sudathip Paticheep Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14456/2022020201

Keywords:

Hopkins syndrome, Monoplegia, Acute asthmatic attack, Asthmatic amyotrophy

Abstract

Background: Hopkins syndrome is a polio-like paralytic illness following a few days after asthmatic attack. Although very rare, the disease has devastating clinical outcomes.

Case Report: The patient was a 4-year-old girl presenting with acute monoplegia of her right arm six days after an event of acute asthmatic attack. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2 signal intensity within the cord from C1 to C6-7 levels, mainly at anterior horns. The patient did not gain motor power improvement after two years of treatment and follow up.

Conclusions: We report a rare case of Hopkins syndrome presented with acute flaccid monoplegia and magnetic resonance imaging pathology. This is the first case report in Southeast Asia

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Khanittha Khusiwilai, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand

Assistant professor in pediatric neurology.

Sudathip Paticheep, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand

Assistant professor in pediatric neurology.

Downloads

Published

2022-08-29

How to Cite

[1]
Mekmangkonthong, A., Khusiwilai, K. and Paticheep, S. 2022. Acute Flaccid Monoplegia After an Asthmatic Attack. Asian Medical Journal and Alternative Medicine. 22, 2 (Aug. 2022), 153–156. DOI:https://doi.org/10.14456/2022020201.

Issue

Section

Case Report